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Tea leaves from the Yunnan Dayeh variety of tea tree are picked, rolled, withered in the hot sun, after which they are steamed. The steaming process generates some moisture and when compressed (without drying) into the cakes, the tea takes on a musty and earthy character over the course of time. Pu-erh that gets somewhat moldy before it naturally dries is considered the best. Pu-erh is then stored in the dark for years. As with wine, the quality of the Pu-erh is considered to improve with age. The taste of Pu-erh becomes more mellow with age. This tea is known for it's medicinal properties. Pu-erh is often taken for relief of indigestion and dysentery but has also been reported very useful in the reduction of cholesterol.

All teas are made from leaves from the Camellia sinensis plant. Black teas are processed in two ways, CTC (Crush, Tear, Curl) or by the orthodox method. The CTC method cuts the leaves into small pieces known as fannings or dust, that are commonly used in tea bags. Orthodox processing is done either by machines or by hand. Hand processing is used for high quality teas. Leaves are fully oxidized under controlled temperature and humidity. The level of oxidation determines the type of the tea; with fully oxidized becoming black tea, low oxidized becoming green tea, and partially oxidized becoming oolong tea. There are four grades of black tea. Whole-leaf teas are the highest quality, and are graded as "orange pekoe." After the whole-leaf teas, the scale degrades to "broken orange pekoe", fannings, then dusts. Whole-leaf teas are the most valuable, especially if they contain leaf tips. Broken leaves are sold as medium-grade loose teas. 

All teas are made from leaves from the Camellia sinensis plant. Black teas are processed in two ways, CTC (Crush, Tear, Curl) or by the orthodox method. The CTC method cuts the leaves into small pieces known as fannings or dust, that are commonly used in tea bags. Orthodox processing is done either by machines or by hand. Hand processing is used for high quality teas. Leaves are fully oxidized under controlled temperature and humidity. The level of oxidation determines the type of the tea; with fully oxidized becoming black tea, low oxidized becoming green tea, and partially oxidized becoming oolong tea. There are four grades of black tea. Whole-leaf teas are the highest quality, and are graded as "orange pekoe." After the whole-leaf teas, the scale degrades to "broken orange pekoe", fannings, then dusts. Whole-leaf teas are the most valuable, especially if they contain leaf tips. Broken leaves are sold as medium-grade loose teas. Fannings and dusts are used in bagged teas because the greater surface area of the many particles allows for a fast, complete diffusion of the tea into the water. Whole leaf tea requires a longer brewing time because of the smaller leaf surface exposed to the water.

Herb and fruit infusions in some circles are considered a new type of tea. Blended to accommodate the tastes of people who want to experience a refreshing healthy new style of drink without caffeine. Fruit infusions are delicious and can be enjoyed Hot or Cold! Exotic combinations of fruits and herbs that taste light and refreshing are naturally low in sugar, high in vitamin C and naturally caffeine free. Add fresh fruits, a bit of sugar, and a sprig of mint to transform an afternoon cooler into an evening delight.

Green tea is a type of tea that is made from Camellia sinensis leaves that have not undergone the same withering and oxidation process used to make oolong and black tea. Green tea originated in China, but its production has spread to many countries in Asia. Several varieties of green tea exist, which differ substantially because of the varietal of C. sinensis used, growing conditions, horticultural methods, production processing, and time of harvest. Loose leaf green tea has been the most popular form of tea in China since the Southern Song dynasty. While Chinese green tea was originally steamed to prevent oxidization, as it still is in Japan, after the early Ming dynasty it has typically been processed by being pan-fired in a dry wok. Other processes employed in China today include oven-firing, basket-firing, tumble-drying and sun-drying. Green tea is the most widely produced form of tea in China, and almost the only tea produced in Japan.

Green tea is a type of tea that is made from Camellia sinensis leaves that have not undergone the same withering and oxidation process used to make oolong and black tea. Green tea originated in China, but its production has spread to many countries in Asia. Several varieties of green tea exist, which differ substantially because of the varietal of C. sinensis used, growing conditions, horticultural methods, production processing, and time of harvest. Loose leaf green tea has been the most popular form of tea in China since the Southern Song dynasty. While Chinese green tea was originally steamed to prevent oxidization, as it still is in Japan, after the early Ming dynasty it has typically been processed by being pan-fired in a dry wok. Other processes employed in China today include oven-firing, basket-firing, tumble-drying and sun-drying. Green tea is the most widely produced form of tea in China, and almost the only tea produced in Japan.

The green leafy parts of plants are considered herbs. Every other part of the plant, including dried bark, roots, berries, seeds, twigs, or anything else that isn't the green leafy part, is considered a spice. Spices are used in dried form while herbs can be used either fresh or dried. Spices start to lose their flavour when they are ground. So whenever possible, it's best to grind your own spices immediately before using them, rather than using spices that are already ground. You can use a coffee grinder or mortar and pestle for this purpose. While spices don't actually spoil or rot, they will lose their flavour over time. Whole dry spices can last for up to two years if stored properly. Spices last longer when stored in a cool, dry location. An enclosed spice rack or storing them in an opaque container will help your spices keep their flavour longer.

The green leafy parts of plants are considered herbs. Every other part of the plant, including dried bark, roots, berries, seeds, twigs, or anything else that isn't the green leafy part, is considered a spice. Spices are used in dried form while herbs can be used either fresh or dried. Spices start to lose their flavour when they are ground. So whenever possible, it's best to grind your own spices immediately before using them, rather than using spices that are already ground. You can use a coffee grinder or mortar and pestle for this purpose. While spices don't actually spoil or rot, they will lose their flavour over time. Whole dry spices can last for up to two years if stored properly. Spices last longer when stored in a cool, dry location. An enclosed spice rack or storing them in an opaque container will help your spices keep their flavour longer.

The green leafy parts of plants are considered herbs. Every other part of the plant, including dried bark, roots, berries, seeds, twigs, or anything else that isn't the green leafy part, is considered a spice. Spices are used in dried form while herbs can be used either fresh or dried. Spices start to lose their flavour when they are ground. So whenever possible, it's best to grind your own spices immediately before using them, rather than using spices that are already ground. You can use a coffee grinder or mortar and pestle for this purpose. While spices don't actually spoil or rot, they will lose their flavour over time. Whole dry spices can last for up to two years if stored properly. Spices last longer when stored in a cool, dry location. An enclosed spice rack or storing them in an opaque container will help your spices keep their flavour longer.

Oolong tea is a semi-oxidized tea. After withering (which allows the leaves to soften), Oolong tea is produced by tumbling or otherwise bruising the surface of the leaves in order to break down their cells and release enzymes which darken when exposed to the air. Once the tea has achieved the desired colour and flavour development, the leaves are usually rolled or twisted and oxidation is halted by drying. Combining the best qualities of green tea and black tea, Oolong Tea is as clear and fragrant as Green tea, but also as fresh and strong as Black Tea. Oolong embraces a wide variety of leaf styles and flavours and ranges in colour from bright green to nearly black.

A high anti-oxidant herbal from the South African Red Bush, Rooibos is said to contain 50X more anti-oxidants than green tea. Rooibos is also rich in Vitamin C, low in tannins and may ease sleep and digestive problems.

The term White Tea is often used to refer to tea that is merely dried with no additional processing, some to tea made from the buds and immature tea leaves picked shortly before the buds have fully opened and allowed to wither and dry in natural sun, while others include tea buds and very young leaves which have been steamed or fired before drying. Most definitions agree, that white tea is not rolled or oxidized, resulting in a flavour characterized as "lighter" than green or traditional black teas. In spite of its name, brewed white tea is pale yellow. Its name derives from the fine silvery-white hairs on the unopened buds of the tea plant, which give the plant a whitish appearance. The unopened buds are used for some types of white tea. The selection of raw material in white tea manufacture is extremely stringent; only the plucking of young tea leaves with much fine hair can produce good-quality white tea of a high pekoe (grading) value.